MICHAEL MANNuary: Heat (1995) and The Need to Know

At the end of last year, I’d been making more of conscious effort to find more film blogs on the scene. There were travel blogs galore, but for some reason people writing consistently about film was tough to find.

But hours scouting around Bloglovin’ lead me to French Toast Sunday. This blog is a collective of film bloggers all writing film in a fun and non-pretentious way. Honestly, check it out, I’m especially a fan of their Beer + Movie feature in which they pick a beer specifically to go with a movie. A stroke of genius!

Michael Mannuary is the first in the director of the month series!
Courtesy of French Toast Sunday

So it comes as no surprise that French Toast Sunday have started a monthly feature in which they focus on one director a month and, if the following months are anything like the first, they will come with a catchy pun too. They’ve invited other bloggers to join them so I decided to tag along!

I’d obviously heard of Michael Mann before, he’s a pretty well known director, but when I casually googled him to see what film’s of his I had seen, I was quite surprised at myself. Out of his 10 films he has directed that have been released, of which he was screen writer on 9 of them, including the 12 films in which has served as Producer (and he has produced his own films since 1986, don’t you know) I had seen ONE of them. And it was Public Enemies (2009) of all films. Hardly the high point of his career.

I simply had to watch more of Michael Mann’s films to write a post on him. Then I remembered I’ve got one of those little DVD holders that you can store like 30 in for travelling (before the time of streaming/netflix/iPods/etc.) and I had it filled with films that I’d spontaneously bought cheaply at stores like That’s Entertainment on a whim. One of which included Heat (1995).

Michael Mannuary is the first in the director of the month series!
© 1995 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Now, I love a good gangster film, I love the original mob films like Little Caesar (1931)  and the 1990s comeback era with Casino (1995) and Goodfellas (1990). They’re great. In fact, I love them so much I wrote a presentation on Mob based Gangster films for my A Level Film Studies coursework. Heat is something else. It takes gangster films and takes them right into action film territory, it takes the cat and mouse, detective and criminal gang leader classic storyline and puts it in a present day, modern setting. Right out of the dingy, smoky casinos and into the streets. I shamefully need to watch more of Mann’s films, as with a score of 86% on Rotten Tomatoes, Heat doesn’t even make it into Mann’s top 3 best rated films, which is surely a sign that I just don’t know what I’m missing out on with this guy.

The Need-to-Know

Inspiration: Dr Strangelove: or How I learnt to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

Legacy: Sight and Sound ranked him as No. 5 on their list of best directors of the last 25 years, and Total Film magazine ranked him No. 28 on their 100 Best Directors Ever list.

Top films: The Last of the Mohicans (1992), The Insider (1999), Thief (1981)

Up next: Blackhat (2015) is due for initial release Friday 16th January in the Netherlands.

Are you a fan of Michael Mann films? Let me know in the comments below!

Want MORE?

FEBgar Wright: The Blood and Ice Cream Trilogy Reviewed

MARCH of the Coens: Propps’s 31 Narrative Functions of a Fairy-tale applied to Inside Llewyn Davis (2013)

APRILfonso Cuaron: 5 Reasons Prisoner of Azkaban (2003) was the Best Harry Potter Film

Sofia CoppolMAY: Close Scene Analysis of Lost In Translation (2003)

Terry Jilliune: Tideland (2005) and The Nature of Fantasy

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Michael Mannuary is the first in the director of the month series!

 

Rebecca

I'm the human and hair behind Almost Ginger. I'm a cinephile travel obsessive vegetarian currently residing in Manchester.

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