Review: Gone Girl (2014) dir. David Fincher

© TM and © 2014 Twentieth Century Fox and Regency Enterprises© TM and © 2014 Twentieth Century Fox and Regency Enterprises

Gone Girl follows the relationship between Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) and Amy Elliott-Dunne (Rosamund Pike). Amy goes missing on their 5th wedding anniversary. Through a series of flashbacks via Amy’s diary and Nick’s movements in the days after she goes missing, we are thrown into a story of perceptions and media frenzy. How you display yourself and how you make things appear are of much more importance than relying on the truth. Important, and deeply terrifying.

© TM and © 2014 Twentieth Century Fox and Regency Enterprises
© TM and © 2014 Twentieth Century Fox and Regency Enterprises

The twists come more than once in this film. They constantly keep the viewer on their toes and wondering how the hell each half of the couple are going to get themselves out of the next hole they’ve managed to get themselves into. There’s also the matter that neither one of the couple are particularly nice. Just when you’re starting to sympathise with one of them or about to forget the terrible deeds they’ve committed previously, they go and rock your opinion of them yet again. They’re both as bad as each other and pretty much deserve everything they get.

If this were a normal film, we wouldn’t care less about what happens. But this isn’t a normal film. This is a Fincher film. You don’t feel normal emotions in a Fincher film than you do in any unremarkable film. Underneath the thriller themes, at the heart of the narrative, you have two people who were once in love, but then grew apart. Their fatal flaws meant that simply breaking up was never, ever going to be an option.

So, to sum up: A gripping, refreshing thriller that is unlike any film I have seen in a long time. Not just the one twist, and won’t be my only viewing of this film, either. Kudos again, Mr Fincher.

5/5

© TM and © 2014 Twentieth Century Fox and Regency Enterprises
© TM and © 2014 Twentieth Century Fox and Regency Enterprises

 

 

Other Fincher films you may enjoySe7en (1995) and The Social Network (2010) are both excellent Fincher films.

Want MORE?

If you’re a fan of film reviews, you might want to read about why Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2003) is the best in the series, and my close scene analysis of Lost in Translation.

Rebecca

I'm the human and hair behind Almost Ginger. I'm a cinephile travel obsessive vegetarian currently residing in Manchester.